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Free images -  Butterflies - Page 2

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Harris checkerspot butterfly on dandelion.

Harris Checkerspot gathering nectar from a Dandelion.  (Butterfly-1)
Photographed in Southern Ontario.

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Harris Checkerspot butterfly on green leaves.

Harris Checkerspot Butterfly - 1
Photographed in Southern Ontario

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No larger image available.

 

 

Harris checkerspot butterfly on leaf.

Harris Checkerspot Butterfly - 2
Photographed in Southern Ontario

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Paper Kite

Idea leuconoe is commonly known as the "Paper Kite, Rice Paper" or "Large Tree Nymph".  It is a popular attraction at butterfly displays in greenhouses.  This species is native to the dense forest regions of South China, South Japan, Malaya, Java, Borneo and the Philippines.  

 

paper kite, rice paper, or large tree nymph yellow white black butterfly

Paper Kite - 1
Photographed in a butterfly greenhouse.

Medium - 640 x 480  Right click on above image and chose "save as".

Large - 3264 x 2448  - Still free, but now only available by email request.

 

 

Idea leuconoe Paper Kite butterfly

Paper Kite - 2
Photographed in a butterfly greenhouse.

Medium - 640 x 480  Right click on above image and chose "save as".

Large - 1676 x 2235  - Still free, but now only available by email request.

 

 

Red Admiral Butterfly on white spring Apple Tree blossoms
[White Spring Blooms-11]  Photographed in Southern Ontario.

Medium - 640 x 480  Right click on above image and chose "save as".

Large - 3456 x 4608  - Still free, but now only available by email request.

 

 

Red Admiral Butterfly on white spring Apple Tree blossoms
[White Spring Blooms-12]  Photographed in Southern Ontario.

Medium - 640 x 480  Right click on above image and chose "save as".

Large - 3073 x 4333  -  Still free, but now only available by email request.

 

 

Red admiral butterfly using proboscis to gather nectar from echinacea flower.

Red Admiral Butterfly - 2 using its proboscis to gather nectar from an "Firebird" Echinacea bloom.
Photographed in Southern Ontario.

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Large - 4608 x 3456 - Still free, but now only available by email request.

 

 

Red admiral butterfly gathering nectar from firebird echinacea bloom.

Red Admiral Butterfly - 1 gathering nectar from an "Firebird" Echinacea bloom.
Photographed in Southern Ontario.

Medium - 640 x 480  Right click on above image and chose "save as".

Large - 4608 x 3456 - Still free, but now only available by email request.

 

 

Butterfly gathering nectar from Echiacea flower.

Red Admiral Butterfly - 3 gathering nectar from an "Firebird" Echinacea bloom.
Photographed in Southern Ontario.

Medium - 640 x 480  Right click on above image and chose "save as".

Large - 4608 x 3456 - Still free, but now only available by email request.

 

 

Red admiral butterfly collecting nectar from Echinacea flower bloom.

Red Admiral Butterfly - 4 gathering nectar from an "Firebird" Echinacea bloom.
Photographed in Southern Ontario.

Medium - 640 x 480  Right click on above image and chose "save as".

Large - 3907 x 2931 - Still free, but now only available by email request.

 

 

Tattered wings of a red admiral butterfly on white Echinacea flower

Red Admiral Butterfly - 5 gathering nectar from a white Echinacea bloom.
Photographed in Southern Ontario.

Medium - 640 x 480  Right click on above image and chose "save as".

Large - 3264 x 2448 - Still free, but now only available by email request.

 

Notice the tattered wings on this specimen.  Although butterflies are not as fragile and dainty as we seem to think, their wings do break and the scales come off.  Neither the scales nor the wings grow back.  I've been told, however, that a butterfly can still fly with as much as 75% of their wings missing!

 

Brown orange red admiral butterfly

Red Admiral Butterfly - 6 gathering nectar from a white Echinacea bloom.
Photographed in Southern Ontario.

Medium - 640 x 480  Right click on above image and chose "save as".

Large - 3264 x 2448 - Still free, but now only available by email request.

 

Did you know.. Why are butterflies called butterflies?

One story is that the word butterfly came from a mistaken "flutter by" description.  This, however, is not the case.  The stories most accepted are that in Europe, yellow butterflies hovered around milk as it was churned to butter or that in England, the most common butterfly was yellow and looked like butter.  The Old English term was "buterfleoge".  

Another story is that people though that butterflies, or witches that took the shape of butterflies, came to steal butter and milk.

In some other languages, the term butterfly means "the licker of milk" and "milk theif".  In Russia, they are called "babochka" or "little soul".  The ancient Greeks called butterflies "psyche" which also means "soul". Sioux Indians called butterflies "fluttering wings".  

I've saved the most unpleasant story for last.  When butterflies go to the toilet, their excrement is a yellow, blacky stool.  Hence the Dutch name for butterfly is "boterschjte".  Yep, it means what it sounds like!

    

Butterfly Image Pages  [1]   [2]

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If you'd like to drop me a note to let me know if any of these images have been useful, I'd love to hear from you. I'm curious to see if my snapshots have been of benefit to you in some way.  Also, I'd like to hear what kind of images you'd like to see more of. 

 

 


 

Are You Baffled 
by Bugs ?

Did you know...

That all insects are bugs, but not all bugs are insects!

 


"I dreamed
 I was a butterfly,
 flitting around 
in the sky; 
then I awoke.  
Now I wonder:  
Am I a man 
who dreamt 
of being a butterfly, 
or am I a butterfly
dreaming 
that I am a man?"

~ Chuang Tse ~
Chinese philosopher

 

Insects have 3 body parts:  a head, thorax and abdomen.  They also have six legs and two antennae.

Spiders and Scorpions have eight legs and are not considered insects!

 

According to some sources, the total number of insect species is somewhere between 15 and 30 million!

There are 900,000 known species in the world.

 

Insane About Insects ?

 

Did you know...

Scorpions can live for more than one year without eating!

 

Mosquitoes have 47 teeth, but only the female mosquitoe bites using it's proboscis.

Fireflies, sometimes called Lightningbugs, are not true bugs or flies.  They are beetles!

Every year, insects eat about one third of the world's food crops.

Only male crickets can chirp.  They will chirp faster in warm weather.  

Most insects hatch from eggs.

The average bed contains 2-6 million dust mites!

 

Are You An Enthusiastic
Entomologist ?

Did you know...

Every year, the average person eats several insects while sleeping.  

Insects breath through a complicated network of air tubes called tracheae that open along the sides of the insects body.

Nearly all insect growth involves metamorphosis.

The average housefly lives only two weeks!

A female ladybug lays about 1000 eggs in her lifetime.

Honeybees fly at a speed of 13-15 mph.

Even though spiders have eight eyes, they still can't see very well.

A cockroach can live up to 9 days without its head!

 

 

 

 

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