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Free images of the Wampanoag Homesite 
at Plimoth Plantation Museum*

Note on large files:  Very large files may be bigger than your screen.  
Right click on any portion of the image showing and chose "save as". 

*These images have been posted with the very kind permission of the Plimoth Plantation Museum
and may be used as per the
Terms of Use for educational purposes only.

 


The Plimoth Plantation Museum was started in 1947 in an effort to preserve the story of the new colony at Plymouth.  The Wampanoag Homesite was added in 1973.  Plimoth Plantation provides visitors with a visual interpretation of the way of life in the 1600’s.

The Wampanoag Homesite is a re-created Native encampment that represents the ways of life for the Native Peoples that lived in the New England area in the 17th century.  According to signage at the plantation, it is a representation of the single-family home of Hobbamock.  Hobbamock was a councilman to the sachem (leader) Ousamequin, also known as Massasoit.  Hobbamock was asked by Ousamequin to act as a liaison between his people and the Plymouth colonists.   

 

Did you know....

that the name “Wampanoag” means “Eastern People” or “People of the First Light” or “People of the Dawn”.  The Wampanoag were the Native People of south eastern Massachusetts, Cape Cod and the Islands who had lived here for 11,600 years prior to the arrival of the pilgrims.  They were living in 67 villages in Wampanoag territory when the Mayflower ship arrived.  Wampanoag people were living in the area for 11,600 years prior to the arrival of the Pilgrims.  The Wampanoag were great at hunting, fishing, planting and harvesting.

The images below are from the re-creation at Plimoth Plantation Museum and show us what Hobbamock's 10-person home site would have looked like from the spring to the fall.  The family would have moved to an inland village for the winter.

 

Wampanoag longhouse Plimoth Plantation

Wampanoag Longhouse reproduction at Plimoth Plantation Museum -1

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The Wampanoag did NOT lives in tepees.  Tepees (sometimes called “tipis”) were structures used by the Native Peoples in the Great Plains area.

A traditional Wampanoag home, named a “Nush Wetu” is dome-shaped.  It was made with cedar posts and tied with cedar bark.  Finally it was covered with bark or cattail reeds.  

 

Entrance to Wampanoag structure.

Wampanoag Longhouse reproduction at Plimoth Plantation Museum - 2

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Bark covering Wampanoag longhouse.

Bark covers a Wampanoag Longhouse reproduction at Plimoth Plantation Museum -3

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Bark on a Wampanoag longhouse at Plimoth Plantation

Wampanoag Longhouse reproduction at Plimoth Plantation Museum

Medium - 640 x 480  Right click on above image and chose "save as".

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A rack for drying bark.

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Roof opening of a longhouse.

Wampanoag Longhouse roof opening

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Inside a Wampanoag longhouse.

Wampanoag Longhouse reproduction interior - 1

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A bark covered long house is called a “Nush wetu”.  Beds were made from timber and covered with fur hides.   Food was stored in bags made of bull rush.  Bags were also made out of other plant fibers such as Milkweed, Dogbane or False Nettle.

 

Beds and fire inside a Wampanoag longhouse.

Wampanoag Longhouse reproduction interior - 2

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  Did you know....

that the Wampanoag dug out canoes from hollowing out large trees? The boats are called “mishoons” and were used for fishing and transportation.  A fire was used to hollow out the logs, burning 24-hours a day, the entire length of the canoe.  The burning pushed the sap into the wood and made it water proof. 

 

Burning the interior of log to make a boat.

Native People's boat demonstrating the burning of the interior - 2

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Large - 768 x 1024 - Full sized images now only available by email request.

 

 

Making a canoe by burning interior.

Native People's boat demonstrating the burning of the interior - 3

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A completed mishoon canoe boat.

Native People's boat demonstrating the burning of the interior - 1

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Native peoples fishing net.

Native People's fishing net hanging out to dry.

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Pine branch fencing.

Small pine branch fence.

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  Did you know....

that the Wampanoag first began practicing agriculture in 1525?  Unlike we do now, they planted their crops together!  First, corn was planted and allowed to grow until it was about 2 feet high.  Then beans and squash were planted.  The beans used the corn stalks as support to grown upon and the squash leaves provided shade for the beans to grow.  They also collected the morning dew and slowly released this back into the ground as moisture for the plants. 

The Wampanoag shared their knowledge concerning the growing of crops and navigation.  They helped the colonists to survive.

 

Fur pelts laying to dry.

Fur pelts drying - 1
Pelts were used as clothing and bedding.

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Fur pelts at Plimoth Plantation.

 Fur pelts - 1

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World Cultures

 

"People of 
different religions 
and cultures 
live side by side
 in almost every part|
of the world, 
and most of us have overlapping identities 
which unite us 
with very different groups.  
We can love what we are,
 without hating what 
- and who - 
we are not.  
We can thrive 
in our own tradition, 
even as we learn 
from others, 
and come to respect 
their teachings."

~Kofi Annan ~
former 
Secretary-General 
of the United Nations

 



 

"Preservation of 
one's own culture 
does not require
 contempt 
or disrespect
 for other cultures."

~ Cesar Chavez ~
American Activist 
and Labour Organizer.  
Founder of the National Farm Workers Association
(1927-1993)

 


 

 

"It is the mark 
of the cultured man 
that he is aware 
of the fact 
that equality 
is an ethical 
and not a biological principle."

~ Ashley Montagu ~
British-American anthropologist
1905 - 1999

 

 

"We may have 
different religions, 
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different coloured skin, 
but we all belong 
to one human race."

~ Kofi Annan ~
Ghanian Diplomat, 
7th UN Secretary-General, 
2001 Nobel Peace Prize Winner

 

 

"We have 
the ability to achieve, 
if we master 
the necessary goodwill,
 a common global society 
blessed with a shared culture 
of peace 
that is nourished by 
the ethnic, 
national and 
local diversities
 that enrich our lives."

~ Mahnaz Afkhami ~
Iranian-American 
Human rights activist.

 

 

 

"Difference 
is of the essence 
of humanity.  
Difference
 is an accident of birth 
and it should therefore 
never be the source
 of hatred 
or conflict.  
The answer to difference
 is to respect it.  
Therein lies a most 
fundamental principle of peace:  respect for diversity."

~ John Hume ~
Irish Politician, 
1998 Nobel 
Peace Prize Winner, 
1999 Defender of 
Democracy Award, 
2001 Gandhi Peace Prize

 

 

 

 

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